As I’m attached to the European’s minimalist/ maximalist style of nowadays —spending approximately between 2012 to 2014 trying to resolve what’s in there that got me so hooked up to that style— I’m also an admirer of my country 70-80’s style.

The local style that I always see in the old movies, I go crazy for the things that develop from nothing; when the high-class women were equally stylish to the french woman in that generation, the locals invented a style you can not see but in Egypt that’s considered as a cultural remark till this day. The innovation of some remarks was only for the functionality of it and evolved to suit every taste; then to become a lifestyle that you can not wake up without wearing.


 

The headscarf, for example, is something I saw all my grandma generation wore and never took off; except for shower; even while sleeping. My grandma used to tell me if she ever took it off she could have a headache. They were hard workers women who raised approximately between 5 to 16 child, prepared food every day and got them all to school; only thinking of that gives me a headache. How anyone could handle that and we reached the point where we’re afraid of commitment and raise one child? I don’t say that they were right but sure they got gumption!

The headscarf was everywhere and some of the younger generation wore a more festive version of it but only when they went out— that’s a whole other story that I’ll post about later because I can’t find this particular version anywhere now.


The one I’m wearing is my grandpa sister’s; she wears them daily and I asked her to give me that flowered pattern; because it’s so Italian to the majority of people but it’s also a huge part of ours as well. She surprised me with three of them, the red, the blue and the dark blue; one of them is so distressed and she doesn’t even wear it anymore but damn sure I will. I also took them because I wanted something from those very few elder people left in my family that I know so little about and want to spend the rest of my life just hearing about their lives.

On the other hand, the belt is handmade from Sinai; Called it a culturally vintage piece, which is nothing actually compare to those women traditional customs; I never went there (shame on me) and planning to go very very soon. I don’t know what my reaction will be like if I saw that much colors on one lady in real life… I think I’ll rob her cloth or weep from greatness. 

How to wear vintage

Sinai Bedouin Custom and the scarf pattern on her head.

I combined the two in my daily modern wear; a check coat the I wear a lot lately; a cream sweater that I finally washed and an old boyfriend denim that I wish it’s less distressed; (I need more jeans in my life); underneath, I wore burgundy wool tights that not only help from freezing but also look amazing with my metallic sandal—who said that I can only wear sandals in summer nights!? When I wore the belt I closed the first buttons of the check coat, tucked the sweater and let the belt play its vintage magic in a land of modernity that desperately needed this belt to flourish.

A moment to think: I consider fashion as a spiral route that sometimes widens and sometimes tightens, always playing with the same ingredients to create new recipes from the heritage the oldest left for us.

As for how to wear vintage scarf, I wore it in regular two ways, on neck and head but it gives you that I don’t know… power, maybe that what I feel when I wear something not only vintage but relatively vintage, Dad’s jacket, I felt that with my mom’s coat, yep, it’s just so refreshing. It makes me go that extra step to create what I call as Fashion Paradoxes.

Have you ever wore not only vintage but relatively vintage, culturally vintage pieces? What’s the story behind it? What’s the one you’ll add!? Show me with pictures!

H&M coat; Zara pants and sandal; Massimo Dutti tights and Mango sweater. The rest is history.